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Sion Milosky charged big waves and a fun, balanced life

Sep 21, 2011 | Schedulefly Crew
I am always drawn towards people that seem to be really enjoying life now versus living a "means to an end" type life - in hopes of having a life they want in the future. I am trying to be more like them. Life is definitely a long search that may never end - but accepting a life I don't really want now in hopes of retiring to a better life later just makes no sense - because it may never happen. What if later, I physically can't do what I would have loved to have done now? What if later, the people and things I have around me now that make my life great are gone? What a shame to be so focused on later while the very best things in life are passing me by now.

I recently watched a short documentary on one of the most respected big wave riders ever known - Sion Milosky. Sion lived on the North Shore of Hawaii and his life literally evolved around surfing huge waves. Simon, among other things, is credited throughout the surf world with paddling into what many believe is the biggest wave ever paddled into. This documentary is awesome. It's just Sion in his car talking about life and why he loves to ride big waves and what he has to do to prepare not only himself but his friends and family. He talks about his wife and two young daughters and the balance that he has with them and how they understand his passion. In fact, I also read an interview with him in Surfing magazine and he talked about one of the best surfing sessions he ever had - on Christmas day. His wife and daughters hurriedly opened their gifts Christmas morning so he could be in the lineup, ready to go, by 8am.

In the documentary below, he also talks about how he plans on enjoying life now and surfing more now - while he is still young and able - yet still needing to work and be a good father and husband - which I am sure he was. You can tell that he knows that that time was the best time in his life. That time during that interview appeared to be what he was living for and striking the right balance in life so he could keep charging and chasing big waves was part of the ride.



Back in March of this year, Sion passed away. He died surfing in California during another big swell. He was 35.

I think this documentary is now more than just a glimpse into the mind of a big wave surfer, it's a lesson. It's a lesson for all of us that we should figure out how to enjoy life now.

Wes